Montezuma Valley Blue Horizons

View from Park Point, Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado

The Montezuma Valley from Park Point in Mesa Verde National Park.

After a late May cold front that gave us more snow and hurt the Oak leaves that were trying to emerge, for the second time (don’t worry, they are tough), we seem to be back to wonderful late spring weather. Warm during the day, but not hot. Chilly at night, but only freezing for a night or two.

Now that true May weather has resumed, I continue to watch the rest of the deciduous vegetation unfold.

Photo location: Mesa Verde National Park, southwest Colorado.

© Copyright 2017 Stephen J. Krieg

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Goodbye Monticello

Springtime scenery photo of Loyds Lake, in San Juan County, southeast Utah.

Loyds Lake, Monticello, Utah

As things have turned out, it was time for me to leave southeast Utah. It had been a wonderful three years, first living at Natural Bridges National Monument at the north end of Cedar Mesa, then a half year in a town, Monticello, Utah.

My time in Monticello started in this past fall, my favorite time of year. Warm days, crisp nights at 7,000 feet. A lot of trout fishing at Loyds Lake. It soon became my Walden Pond, now that I was officially retired.

Being free of a job, of somewhere to be each day, was liberation. At first. But as the winter wore on and the lake froze over, it was less and less fun. I needed something to do.

So now I work at Mesa Verde National Park in southwest Colorado, a mere 60 miles east of Monticello. I help to raise money for the park, working for the Mesa Verde Museum Association, the nonprofit partner of the park. It provides structure for my life, even though I do have to be certain places on certain days at certain times. It’s a heck of a lot better than being fully “retired”.

Panorama photo of springtime green agricultural fields near Dove Creek, Colorado.

Springtime on the Great Sage Plain, Dove Creek, Colorado, between Monticello and Cortez.

© Copyright 2017 Stephen J. Krieg

See more of my photography at www.NaturalMoment.com

Rocky Mountain Snowmelt

Dolores River, Colorado springtime runoff

Dolores River, springtime runoff

It’s southwest Colorado and the springtime is advancing. Sometimes not quickly enough for warm weather visitors, and sometimes a bit too warm for residents that are wary of drought. Since none can control the weather, we should appreciate what comes.

What comes, sooner or later, is the greening of the landscape with the deciduous trees and shrubs. The grasses, and the forbs with their wildflowers.

Dolores River, Colorado

Dolores River spring runoff.

And so I drove up along the upper Dolores River valley. From Cortez and the little river town of Dolores itself. Up along the broad flat floodplain ranches and smaller properties. Cottonwood trees leafing out along the river. Aspen stands breaking out tenatiously on the mountain slopes above.

San Juan Mountains, Lizard Head Pass, Colorado.

San Juan Mountains, Lizard Head Pass, Colorado.

The Dolores River swollen with snow melt from the high mountains. Muddy and cold and doing its job of continuing to sculpt the high mountain landscape.

I drove up to Lizard Head Pass, the divide between the Dolores and the San Miguel River watersheds. It was like going from spring to winter. But it will soon be spring up there, too.

Photo location: southwest Colorado.

© Copyright 2017 Stephen J. Krieg

Upper Dolores River Springtime Green

Dolores River Valley, upstream of Dolores, Colorado.

Dolores River Valley, upstream of Dolores, Colorado.

Driving up the Dolores River valley, from Cortez, Colorado. In springtime. Gorgeous greens on the river floodplain. Grasses and forbs celebrating the Spring season. Cottonwood trees leafing out above.

© Copyright 2017 Stephen J. Krieg

Mesa Verde National Park highway, from Point Lookout.

Point Lookout, Mesa Verde

Point Lookout, Mesa Verde National Park, from the entrance road.

Point Lookout, from just inside the entrance to Mesa Verde National Park. It will be even greener soon, when the Gambel Oak have fully leafed out.

When visitors drive into Mesa Verde National Park in southwest Colorado, the first thing that grabs their attention is a promontory called Point Lookout. As they will soon find out, they will be driving up a series of switchbacks taking them around its eastern flanks to a notch in the topography that has them up onto the northern end of the mesa. From there the road winds back and forth as it negotiates the North Rim, heading toward the Far View Lodge, and on to the Museum and the Cliff Dwellings.

Utah Serviceberry in bloom, Point Lookout Trail, Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado

Utah Serviceberry in bloom, Point Lookout Trail.

But what of that vertical chunk of bright sandstone towering far above the greening slopes? Wouldn’t it be awesome to be on top of that, looking over the edge?

Utah Serviceberry in bloom along the Point Lookout Trail, overlooking Morefield Campground, Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado.

Utah Serviceberry in bloom along the Point Lookout Trail, overlooking Morefield Campground. The gray patches are Gambel Oak, which are just starting to leaf out.

It is, and you can go there, too. It’s the Lookout Point Trail, and it begins at the end of the campground road, near the Amphitheater.

North Rim of Mesa Verde, with Sleeping Ute Mountain in the distance, from the Point Lookout Trail.

Looking southwest along the North Rim of Mesa Verde, from the Point Lookout Trail.

The trail is only 2.2 miles round trip, but it does climb 400 feet in the first mile. So it’s strenuous, but well built, with plenty of switchbacks to keep the grade reasonable. And there are spectacular views along that part of it, as well.

Paintbrush blooming atop Point Lookout, Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado.

Paintbrush blooming atop Point Lookout, May 4, 2017.

Before too long I had crested the southern rim of Point Lookout. Easy walking on top from there.

Common Paintbrush, Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado.

Paintbrush blooms closeup.

The northern rim of the Point is spectacular, of course. Rather dizzying from too near the edge, looking down on the park road, the Visitor and Research Center and the Mancos Valley, with the still-snowy La Plata Mountains in the distance.

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View north from Point Lookout, with the Mesa Verde park entrance road far below.

Another view to the southwest peers out over the Montezuma Valley and the town of Cortez, with Sleeping Ute Mountain in the distance.

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View southwest along the North Rim of Mesa Verde, toward Sleeping Ute Mountain.

Then it was back down the switchbacks to the trailhead. Going downhill, working the quad muscles this time. A good walk on a stellar early May day, and I didn’t meet another person in the 1.5 hours it took. Sweet.

Tent caterpillar nest in Utah Serviceberry, Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado.

Tent caterpillar nest in Utah Serviceberry, Point Lookout Trail.

Photo location: Mesa Verde National Park, southwest Colorado.

See more of my photography at www.NaturalMoment.com

© Copyright 2017 Stephen J. Krieg